Philosophy

PHIL 100-C01 Introduction to Philosophy    
Anna Mudde    CRN 32194    MWF 1130-1220  
 
Philosophy 100 is an introduction to the study of philosophy. It is intended to introduce you to philosophical questions, to give you an idea of what some of history’s greatest philosophers have said about them, and to help you learn how to articulate philosophical concerns of your own. The branches of philosophy considered in the course will be selected from ethics, aesthetics, logic, metaphysics, political philosophy and the theory of knowledge.

PHIL 100-C02 Introduction to Philosophy    
Paul Omoyefa    CRN 32195    MWF 1230-1320
    
Philosophy 100 is an introduction to the study of philosophy. It is intended to introduce you to philosophical questions, to give you an idea of what some of history’s greatest philosophers have said about them, and to help you learn how to articulate philosophical concerns of your own. The branches of philosophy considered in the course will be selected from ethics, aesthetics, logic, metaphysics, political philosophy and the theory of knowledge.

PHIL 150-C01 Critical Thinking    
Paul Omoyefa    CRN 32199    MWF 0930-1020    

Critical thinking—also called logic—is the study of how to distinguish good reasoning from bad, correct thinking from incorrect. It’s a little like grammar: we use it all the time, usually without thinking about it. But like grammar, critical thinking involves universal rules that you may not be familiar with. Studying these rules will help you to use them more effectively, and so to become a better thinker. In the first half of the course, we’ll study some of the basic concepts of critical thinking. We’ll pay particular attention to the concept of an argument, and to related notions such as classification and definition. We’ll also study techniques that you can use to assess the strength of an argument and to spot fallacies (errors in reasoning). The second part of the course will be devoted to somewhat more technical topics. We’ll spend several weeks studying classical deductive logic as developed by Aristotle. We’ll also take a look at modern propositional logic, at inductive logic, and at the connections between critical thinking and other important topics.

PHIL 216-C01 Existential Philosophy    
Robert Piercey    CRN 32203    MWF 0930-1020 
   
This course is a serious introduction to the philosophical movement known as existentialism. After taking a quick look at the historical background to this movement, we’ll turn to the work of three of the best-known existential philosophers: Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir. We’ll pay particular attention to their views on freedom and the nature of consciousness. We’ll also spend some time discussing existentialism’s relevance for ethics, the arts, and our understanding of gender.

PHIL 332-C01 Philosophy of History    
PHIL 432-C01 20th Century Analytical Phil
Robert Piercey       CRN 32208 (332); 32211 (432)    T 1300-1545   

In Philosophy 332, we’ll reflect critically on the study of history. We’ll examine a number of philosophical questions that are raised by the kind of thinking that historians do, and we’ll ask how the study of history might be related to other important philosophical themes. The course will be divided into three parts. The first will focus on the epistemology of history—that is, on whether and to what extent we can acquire knowledge of the past. Among other things, we’ll ask what it might mean to explain an historical event, and whether historians can be objective. The second part of the course will address so-called “speculative” historians—that is, those who attribute a meaning or purpose to history as a whole. As an example, we’ll read Hegel’s Lectures on the Philosophy of History. Finally, in the third part of the course, we’ll examine what might be called “existential” approaches to history. Our main text for this part of the course will be Nietzsche’s On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life.    

PHIL 335CF-C01 Philosophy for Cyborgs: Technology in Peculiar Places
PHIL 435CF-C01 Philosophy & Technology II    
Anna Mudde       CRN 32209 (335); 32212 (435)    MWF 0930-1020  
 
The root of "technology" is technē -- the combining of human reason and judgment with the material world. In this course, we look for technologies in peculiar places, including practices of care, eugenics, making race and disability, and philosophy. Reading works in philosophy, literature, and science and technology studies (STS), we’ll theorize technologies and discover that we are always already “cyborgs.”